Who says TAG Heuer isn't a good investment!

  1. Aquagraph

    Aquagraph Jul 14, 2020

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  2. Mr_Orange

    Mr_Orange Jul 14, 2020

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    Yep, you should be able to retire now :thumbsup:.

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    Sorry, couldn't resist :).
     
    Aquagraph likes this.
  3. Mr_Orange

    Mr_Orange Jul 14, 2020

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    Serious reply. If you plug your watch collection into your Chrono24 profile (assuming you have one) it will track the average value of your watches and show the increase/decrease compared to what you paid for them.
     
    Anthony.R likes this.
  4. Aquagraph

    Aquagraph Jul 14, 2020

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    Oooh, that's interesting - I don't have, maybe I should!
     
  5. Mr_Orange

    Mr_Orange Jul 14, 2020

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    :thumbsup:
     
  6. imagwai

    imagwai Jul 14, 2020

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    I use Chrono24 to keep track too, it's a reasonable indicator for insurance values, but it doesn't necessarily get the current valuations spot on (if anything it tends to over-estimate slightly).

    Would be interesting to hear in this thread how other people have fared on values over the years.

    My second biggest loss on a watch was attributable to a Carrera - the JH80th :) Biggest loss was an Omega Aqua Terra. Both these watches I bought new from an AD, though. I was also pretty green when it came to buying watches at that stage.

    My biggest gain was my 1980s blue Tudor Submariner - bought for £2500 sold for £4400. Probably worth a lot more now, though!

    And of the Carrera I still have, the CS3110 - that was bought for £1400 and now worth £2500 probably. The gains reflecting more how the watch manufacturers have all moved their prices significantly upwards in general over the last few years.

    The good news is that despite owning about 60 watches over the last 8 years, I have broken even, or am probably slightly ahead if I were to cash in my current collection. That to me is an excellent return for being able to enjoy so many amazing watches and certainly more fun than keeping the money in the bank earning 0.1% interest! :)
     
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  7. Mr_Orange

    Mr_Orange Jul 14, 2020

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    My overall collection is up 8%. My 3 limited edition TAGs are up between 12 and 22% - all bought second hand. 3 watches bought new at ADs are down between 12 and 23%. My biggest winner is the Carrera Calibre 36 which is up 31% - bought new at the boutique for a great price after it was discontinued. Rather surprisingly, my s/el is up 15%, also bought second hand.
     
  8. Aquagraph

    Aquagraph Jul 14, 2020

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    Doubt my collection has appreciated much, if at all. In fact I would assume a thumping loss... but then that's not why I bought it so I don't really care. Could make for a good blog post though...
     
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  9. THJunkie

    THJunkie Jul 14, 2020

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    I’ve no idea what my collection has done. As I tend to buy on impulse then i doubt it has done well. I focus more on cost of acquisition rather than having any clue about future value. Figuring they all drop so might as well push to share the pain rather than take all the hit myself.

    I still enjoy them all so on that basis the return is good! :thumbsup:. i’m far too ‘lazy’ to faff about with ebay and selling them on, so I imagine part-exing would be the only factor that would entail knowing what hit I took down the road.
     
  10. Aquagraph

    Aquagraph Jul 14, 2020

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    I'm already getting annoyed by YouTube gurus telling people not to buy the blue Tudor 58 because it's not a good investment. Who f**king cares? It's a nice watch, buy it, enjoy it... the only reason you should ever buy a watch is because it appeals to you. If not, just buy yourself a Casio and put your money in the bank!
     
  11. imagwai

    imagwai Jul 14, 2020

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    I recently sold my Black Bay 58 black in order to buy the blue version. Made about £100 profit but the main reason for that was because Tudor increased the retail price since I bought it. I think that's an excellent result.

    I certainly haven't bought the blue with the intention to make money - if I had, it would already be for sale. As I bought it brand new, I'm not expecting it to retain all its value, but it'll be nice if it does. At some point I expect supply will catch up with demand, and then we might see used prices more in line with Tudor's other models.

    I've definitely seen a few up for sale at crazy prices. Question is, are they selling? Watch this video to see how artificial price inflation works. Not saying that's definitely happening, but some could certainly be trying their hand at that game.
     
  12. abrod520

    abrod520 Jul 14, 2020

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    +1 x 1000

    We don't get many here, but on the Omega Forum we get a couple people each month showing up asking "Should I buy this watch as an investment?" and the answer is always NO
     
  13. imagwai

    imagwai Jul 14, 2020

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    Nobody can predict the financial future. Just look at what has happened this year for example.

    I've always taken the view that I will enjoy my money more if I wear it on my wrist rather than have it sitting in the bank. Not looking to beat the stock market or anything. :)
     
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  14. Mspeedster

    Mspeedster Jul 14, 2020

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    I bought a Rolex Submariner about 11 years ago. Used samples today are selling for twice the price of what mine cost me. It's still one of my "go to" watches, but honestly, it's probably the most boring watch to me in my line up. I'm just saving it for my son, who knows what it will be worth by the time it's passed on. LOL
     
  15. abrod520

    abrod520 Jul 14, 2020

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    Especially now that the stock market is essentially a way for rich funds to take regular peoples' money rather than the wealth generator it used to be, I'd rather enjoy my discretionary income too :)

    It's one thing to look for the best deal on a watch, especially a new one that will almost certainly depreciate. But it's never a good idea to buy a watch thinking you'll make money on it down the line. It can be nice to feel safer buying an expensive vintage watch if you think it will at least hold value, sure, but if you're looking to retire on your watch collection you're probably not gonna do too well. Watches are going to end up performing a lot like older cars - what appeals to one generation may be disinteresting to another. Look at American muscle cars vs air-cooled 911s, from 2000 to today.
     
  16. imagwai

    imagwai Jul 14, 2020

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    This is a really good point. One could argue that 60s and 70s watches are hot right now because those are the decades a lot of us grew up in. Of course those decades produced some great designs too, but how many of us have considered a birth year watch for instance? Who's to say these watches won't fall out of favour like antique furniture has done?
     
  17. Aquagraph

    Aquagraph Jul 14, 2020

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    Absolutely, things have their time. People buying 'Beatles' collectables thinking they will always be valuable - I don't think so. Eventually that will be so long ago that hardly anyone will care anymore. Can't wait for the Kirium to have its time and get the re-release treatment in 2040! ;)
     
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  18. abrod520

    abrod520 Jul 14, 2020

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    I think '60s watches (or reissues thereof) will always be the most popular, since that was really the decade that watches came into their own as lifestyle pieces. The real period IMO is 1953 (introduction of the Zodiac Sea Wolf and Blancpain Fifty Fathoms, the first dive watches) to 1972 (introduction of the Royal Oak, the first "luxury" steel watch) but the 60s was when all the major players of today found their niches really.

    Mid '70s watches through the early 90s tended to focus much more on design statements, since that was one of the few ways they could differentiate themselves from quartz.

    How many are looking for birth year watches? Well, not me - I was born in the '80s, so not much to go for there unless I want a Swatch :):puke::)... Could try to find an '80s Speedmaster Professional but those are really hard to pin down the years of, plus they were the same spec between 1978 and 1989 or so.
     
  19. Aquagraph

    Aquagraph Jul 14, 2020

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    Nothing in the 80s..... :eek:
     
  20. abrod520

    abrod520 Jul 14, 2020

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    An '80s Autavia or Carrera, even an 844 or 980 diver would be pretty much just the same design from the late '70s, it didn't really change. So like the Speedmasters, those are '70s watches to me.