The new name for the Calibre 1887 is....

  1. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Dec 16, 2014

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    ...the CH-01. (source). From memory, this is the fourth name for the movement:
    - Prototype: Calibre 18
    [​IMG]
    - Calibre 1887
    - CH-1887 (briefly called this in the press release that announced the pause on the CH-80, but name never commercialised)
    - and now CH-01

    dc
     
  2. dsio

    dsio Ash @ ΩF Staff Member Dec 16, 2014

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    Are any specifications different in CH-01 compared to the previous 1887?
     
  3. Hubert

    Hubert Dec 16, 2014

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    Oh marketing...
     
  4. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Dec 16, 2014

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    I recall hearing that it was JCB who wanted to change the name of the CH-80 from Calibre 1969, so this makes sense. It's clearly the way he wants to go on nomenclature and is a good way of distinguishing the in-house Calibres from the ones sourced externally. Only problem is that it's similar to Breitling's B01 movement. Still, wouldn't be the first time that (TAG) Heuer and Breitling have shared a name (Chronomatic and Chrono-matic).
     
  5. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Dec 16, 2014

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    None that we know of at this stage. The latest Carrera 1887 now has a "-4" at the end of the reference number to distinguish it from the previous "-3". As TAG Heuer answered themselves, this change is because there were some small changes to the movement, so if we see any changed in the CH-01, expect to see "-5"
     
  6. drunken monkey

    drunken monkey Dec 17, 2014

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    Reminds me of something that miffs me somewhat.
    A member of another forum had a very rare CAR2110 with no suffix; that is it wasn't even a -0 so it was one of the very watches that left the factories.

    When he had the watch sent back for a service, they replaced the movement straight as it was one of their earliest examples (i.e had been in the real world the longest) and they wanted to have it to see how it has "worn". So now, he has a non suffixed watch case with a later example of movement.

    I wish TAGHeuer maintained some sort of discipline about this sort of thing.
    My own watch is a -0 one and I have the idea of the possibility of it having the triangle pillared column wheel movement swapped out for a latter round hole wheel one. The movement and watch case should both be serialised and matched.
    For life.


    That single detail is what makes ownership something more "special".
     
  7. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Dec 17, 2014

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    Interesting point, and I agree with you...but, I also think it's critical to explain in detail what you want/ don't want to happen when you have your watch serviced. 99.5% of people would be delighted to have their old movement swapped out for a new one, and probably see it as great customer service.

    You and I want the old movement, with it's original rotor and column wheel design, so we need to tell whoever services the watch that's what we want. Whenever I have a vintage Heuer serviced, I always ask for the old parts back...most people couldn't care less.

    You're right that the movements aren't marked to a particular serial number, even though the watch is (in two places...which is why polishing out the serial number of the back of the case is pointless!). I like the idea, but it wouldn't be easy to implement, because in the current production process the case and case-back and finished (including engraving) and then the movement is fitted with dial/ hands. They would have to find a way of getting around that.

    The other issue would be with delivered movements from ETA/ Sellita. I believe that these are covered by warranty if they are fitted to the watch, but if TAG Heuer took them out and then engraved them with a number, that might be harder. Still, it's a good idea...

    dc
     
  8. WillMK5

    WillMK5 Dec 17, 2014

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    DC, I've wondered for a long time what possible dial layouts are possible with the 1887/CH-01. Do you know?
     
  9. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Dec 17, 2014

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    As it is at the moment, only the existing 12-6-9, or you can get 3-6-9 in the Bullhead configuration (because you're turning the movement around 90 degrees anti-clockwise.

    In theory, it's possible to add an additional plate and change the layout to for example a two register 3-9, but not sure what the cost of doing this would be and therefore whether it's worth it. I would have thought that a small investment in this to create a "CH-02" that gave a different layout from the same basic movement would be a great way to look like you have a larger range of in-house movements than you really do...
     
  10. WillMK5

    WillMK5 Dec 17, 2014

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    It would allow for the two dial Monaco and Jack Heuer pieces that seem to be favorites. I would love for an updated Monaco with a new movement. Who knows how that will affect their plans to keep prices stable.
     
  11. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Dec 17, 2014

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    Yes, not sure whether there will be any desire to increase investment into CH-01 in the short-term
     
  12. dsio

    dsio Ash @ ΩF Staff Member Dec 18, 2014

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    I'd imagine given the similarities between the CH-01 and 7750 layouts they'd be able to do what ETA did with the 7753 in creating a standard 3-6-9 with crown and pushers at 3.

    Slightly off topic but has anyone seen exact specifications on the 1887/CH-01 in terms of calibre diameter and thickness? Main reason I'm curious is as to whether it would be thin enough to afford top mounted modules
     
  13. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Dec 18, 2014

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    It's 7.27mm thick (vs. 6.5mm for the CH-80)...

    [​IMG]
    not sure how that compares to other chronograph calibres. TAG Heuer did make a prototype power reserve 1887 in what looked like the same case as the standard model, so would have thought a plate could be added...it's the cost that could be the killer
     
  14. dsio

    dsio Ash @ ΩF Staff Member Dec 18, 2014

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    Its not huge by any means, ETA 7750 is ~7.9mm thick so they've taken about half a mm off that. Might be hard to add modules to it though, also wonder if they'd ever consider turning it into a time only in some cases, remember Zenith made those time only or time + calendar El Primeros and in some Panerai they took the 7750 and stripped the chronograph down to a 3-hand movement, could be an interesting option for an in-house Aquaracer Movement
     
  15. WillMK5

    WillMK5 Dec 18, 2014

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    I like this option. The only issue would be in would raise the price of the Aquaracer which might go against the short term TAG Heuer plans to keep their prices at a certain range.
     
  16. dsio

    dsio Ash @ ΩF Staff Member Dec 18, 2014

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    Yea that's the only downside, in-house does typically mean more costly.

    Having said that though, if it meant significantly increasing production of the 1887 family, the economy of scale permitted might offset that to some degree, given they've got a whole new factory producing these movements I'd imagine the cost of that significant infrastructure and tooling investment is the main expense rather than the materials and man-hours.

    Would make for a pretty cool Aquaracer especially if they did something like add an additional barrel for a very long power reserve when removing the chronograph.
     
  17. John Ashwell

    John Ashwell Jan 11, 2015

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    I have a feeling that Drunken Monkey is talking about me in his post...

    I wanted to keep the old movement and requested that they service that one but was told it simply wasn't an option at the Sydney service centre, it was a swap-out or nothing. I also asked for the original movement to be returned to me and they said absolutely not - it had to be sent back to Switzerland.

    When I finally gave the go ahead I asked them to guarantee that the rotor on the replaced movement would be identical to the one taken out and thankfully it was.

    I like the idea of having a "no suffix" CAR2110 and I'm never going to sell it so monetary value is not an issue, but sometimes wish there was some way they could have left the original movement inside...