The first Monaco Re-editions- Limited Edition or not?

  1. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Nov 22, 2014

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    Keen to get some input on the question of the first two Monaco re-editions, CS2110 (1997) and CS2111

    Heuer Monaco CS2110
    [​IMG]
    Heuer Monaco CS2111

    [​IMG]

    Starting with the CS2110, it's fairly clear that this is a limited edition of 5000 watches- says so right here in the catalogue:
    [​IMG]
    And here are the casebacks of those watches, showing the number / 5000. So, no argument that CS2110 is a limited edition of 5000 watches.
    [​IMG]
    The CS2111 is a little different. At first there was this case back
    [​IMG]
    Note that it no longer says limited edition and we now have 5 digits in the number of the watch. Which fits with the description of the watch in the 1999 Catalogue- not a limited edition, but a "numbered series"
    [​IMG]

    I've also seen this case back- same design, but no longer numbered- the watch now has a serial number
    [​IMG]
    And then we have this caseback:
    [​IMG]
    ...which is again numbered, but now with a different design.

    All three of these CS2111s come from well credentialed sellers, so we have to assume all three are genuine...but none appear to be limited editions.

    I wrote my overview of the Monaco re-edition in 2009 and said that both CS2110 and CS2111 were limited editions- but I'm starting to think that this is incorrect
     
  2. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Nov 22, 2014

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    quick update- I've just checked the 2000 TAG Heuer dealers catalogue which has the following image
    IMG_4995.jpg
    This explicitly says "non-limited", but it could still be that the CS2111 was initially an LE in 1998/ 1999 which later changed. The model was on sale until around 2001.
     
  3. dsio

    dsio Ash @ ΩF Staff Member Nov 22, 2014

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    Didn't realise they even went for a plexiglass crystal to give it the same feel as the classic Monaco, that's a really nice touch and something I wish more watchmakers went to the trouble of doing on re-editions, that warmth you get from a plexi (not to mention the fact that its cheap to replace) tends to matter more to me than a 100M depth rating on a watch I'll never take below 1M.

    Did they ever do a re-edition of the blue dial 1133 with the flat horizontal dial furniture in the corners?
     
  4. drunken monkey

    drunken monkey Nov 22, 2014

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    hmm, I didn't mean to start the rabbit hole...

    I think the Monaco example is quite indicative of how LVMH/TAGHeuer were still finding their feet and what kind of market existed for watches at the time.
    As I said in the other thread, this could be a clue to the nature of the Carrera too as the catalogues treat the classic models became a full time range with the introduction of the non-limited Monaco watches although the Carrera.
    The interesting thing to note is that only the limited model has the "correct" case-back.

    Another detail to remember for reference.
     
  5. vricardo

    vricardo Apr 29, 2016

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    But the only real world difference would be the numbering (????/5000) on the case back?
    The whole case and movements seems the same, except maybe for the 12 o'clock index, wich sometimes is a "one-piece" square and other times is a "double" index...
    Any more thoughts on this?
     
    monacoDifferences.jpg
  6. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Apr 29, 2016

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    Yes, just the caseback.

    Both of the dial variations are correct. My best guess here is that TAG Heuer used two dial manufacturers and there were small differences. They do this today as well, with the idea being that if there is a problem with one supplier, you still have stock from the other. I was surprised about this (although it makes sense), because it means you can get small variations between the two suppliers, especially in subtle ways like dial colour or the way that a starburst finish is achieved.

    I haven't seen any evidence that the one piece/ two-piece index tells us anything about the watch's year of manufacture