1. Pitfitter446

    Pitfitter446 Mar 3, 2018

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    Just checked the time and found my carrera glass all mist up inside, not been immersed in water nor snow(lots here at the moment) so placed it with the crown out on radiator in the house to clear hopefully, is this likely to have a long term effect?, never done it before in the 10+ years I've had it.

    Couple of hours in the heat seemed to have cured this, will leave it sitting in the warm with crown out for a while then next near my AD I'll get it checked.
     
    Edited Mar 3, 2018
  2. OttoWilliam

    OttoWilliam Mar 3, 2018

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    Time to visit the watch spa, i guess ?
     
  3. Pitfitter446

    Pitfitter446 Mar 3, 2018

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    Just phoned the AD who recommended keeping it warm and pushing the crown in to keep the movement working and dropping in when next in the area, it may just have been the sudden change in temps from outside in the snow to inside which is very toasty, all beneficial to me but apparently not the watch.
     
  4. abrod520

    abrod520 Mar 3, 2018

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    Leave it resting dial-side down (so that any condensation will collect on the crystal instead of in the movement) and bring it in for service ASAP.
     
  5. Pitfitter446

    Pitfitter446 Mar 3, 2018

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    Cheers, was thinking along those lines.
     
  6. MRC

    MRC Mar 3, 2018

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    If there is enough condensation that it can actually flow, rather than being ruled by surface tension and staying where it was formed, I'd be banging on my watchmaker's door right now! (20h30 Saturday night)

    I have once seen condensation inside the crystal of a Seiko, but it only appeared once on a very hot day (for the UK :D -- the "Cambridge" stage of the 2014 TdF) and it hasn't been seen since with the watch still running fine. I would take it more seriously in a Carrera than a 20 year old quartz Seiko (my London Underground / Paris Metro watch).
     
  7. abrod520

    abrod520 Mar 3, 2018

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    When it cools a bit more all those little molecules can add up to a small droplet, and it's best to have it collected in one place rather than distributed around the movement. Not necessary, but it doesn't hurt to take every precaution.

    If you consider the watch fairly disposable, then I wouldn't worry about it - but if you want to keep that Seiko for a long time or pass it down etc you should have it serviced. At this point that service may well cost more than an outright replacement, though
     
  8. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Mar 4, 2018

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    Yes, very high chance that the seals are gone...so agree that getting it fixed ASAP is the safest course
     
  9. MRC

    MRC Mar 4, 2018

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    I decided some time time ago that it is disposable. I'll keep putting batteries in it for as long as it still works reliably though. I went down the "service costs more than value" route with my Seamaster, but it carries a lot of memories.