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  1. Gatorade

    Gatorade Nov 10, 2020

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    Hello, I am researching a Tag Heuer Autavia GMT that is my fathers. He is experiencing some dementia and the details of how he got it are fuzzy. He says he got it for High School graduation but he graduated in 1966. From my research I am thinking his watch is a 1970’s version. He maybe confused with college graduation in 1971. I am trying confirm a couple details on it if possible and snapped a quick pic of it. I won’t be in town for a few more weeks so getting the serial number will have to wait.

    I think it is a 1971-2 version. It has a smooth back. According to OnTheDash it would have had an MSRP of $129.50, can anyone confirm this for me? The MSRP at the time would help me figure if it was given to him by my grandmother or his uncle. I believe it also has the original bracelet as seen in the pics. Also any idea of a ballpark value now? I have seen a huge range from $3000-$15000 and of course understand condition is always key to value. I am not a watch guy and am learning as I go. No, I would never sell it. Thank you for any new information or confirmed information.
     
  2. Gatorade

    Gatorade Nov 10, 2020

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  3. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Nov 10, 2020

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    Hi- lovely watch. I'd say that this is 1968- early 1970s...not 1966. 1971 is possible, as while this shape was replaced in 1969, the watch still appears in the 1970/ 71 catalogue:

    [​IMG]

    The watch looks to be in nice condition, although will likely need a service. I'm hesitant to give values given the market at the moment, but I'd say that your watch is "better than average"- it's not a 10/ 10 in terms of condition, but maybe 7-8/ 10 if the movement was serviced.

    It's a lovely watch with a great connection to your Dad, so spending a bit of money to get it working well will give you an awesome watch that will last another 50 years
     
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  4. imagwai

    imagwai Nov 11, 2020

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    Great watch in original condition. If you do get it serviced, then be sure to specify no polishing to the case, and the only parts that should be replaced are those in the movement essential to operation and the crystal if the existing one can't be polished.
     
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  5. abrod520

    abrod520 Nov 11, 2020

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    You're correct - this is a Mk.IV version of the 2446C GMT, which appeared at the end of production. That would place it around 1971 or 72, and could have easily been sold even later since not all stock was immediately sold in the year it was produced, of course.

    Depending on the condition of the case, movement, and bracelet, I would say your watch is likely closer to the top of your value range - nice watch heads go for $8k or so while the bracelet alone is worth as much as $4k. Definitely a wonderful keepsake, for sure one to care for and potentially pass down to the next generation too, when the time comes :thumbsup:
     
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  6. Gatorade

    Gatorade Nov 11, 2020

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    Thanks so much for taking the time to look. I know the information was on OnTheDash but being a watch novice I still had no idea how to interpret it as it applied to my fathers watch. It makes sense that it was 70-72 production and probably given as a college graduation present or perhaps he scraped the money to get it himself. Car racing was his passion and Tag Heuer would have been exactly what would have been interested in. Is there a way to contact Tag Heuer with the serial number to research where it was shipped? Also he had a Tag Heuer card in his wallet so he more than likely had a local Tag Heuer certified service on it in the past. An almost 50 year old watch worn on a regular basis would undoubtedly need work at some point. My step mother knows it goes to me but of course I am simply the caretaker for the next generation!

    Thank you again for the information!
     
  7. abrod520

    abrod520 Nov 12, 2020

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    You can find independent watchmakers who will likely take better care of it than TAG would - sending it to TAG directly would run the risk of it coming back with brand-new parts on it, whereas originality is prized for old watches like these.

    I am not personally aware of any service that TAG offers for vintage archive information, but you could always ring them up and ask - never hurts.
     
  8. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Nov 17, 2020

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    Yes, unfortunately TAG Heuer don't have the information on production dates....but agree there is no harm is asking
     
  9. Gatorade

    Gatorade Nov 23, 2020

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    I may have a chance to look it over again this weekend, where would I be able to find the serial number for it?
     
  10. abrod520

    abrod520 Nov 23, 2020

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    On the case between the lugs. The 6 o'clock lugs should have the model reference and the 12 o'clock lugs should have the serial number
     
  11. Gatorade

    Gatorade Nov 30, 2020

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    A little update. Dad isn’t doing well. After this weekends visit my stepmother gave it to me. I haven’t taken the bracelet off yet to look in between the lugs. Is the 3/72 in the bracelet a date stamp? If so then it probably confirms that he bought it for himself. Not a graduation present like I suspected. Thanks for all the information.
     
  12. SteveP

    SteveP Dec 1, 2020

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    Hi, sorry to heard about your Dad.

    You are correct-that is a date stamp; so this bracelet was produced in the 3rd quarter of 1972 (Jul-Sep). As such the watch could not have been purchased anytime before this period. Hope that helps?
    Thanks, Steve
     
  13. abrod520

    abrod520 Dec 1, 2020

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    ^ Assuming he bought the bracelet along with the watch, yes - would have been 3Q 1972 at the earliest.

    Sorry to hear your dad isn't doing well, but at the very least you'll have something to remember him by.
     
  14. Gatorade

    Gatorade Dec 4, 2020

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    Ok, so having lived with it for the last week, I have noticed a couple things. I only have one other manual watch, a vintage Wakmann. The GMT takes a lot longer to wind all the way. Also the minute hand will sometimes push or get caught by the sweep second hand and it will stop all movement. Then I need to start the chronometer and stop it, then reset it. So it may need a service. He has a Tag Heuer card in his wallet but I don’t have access to that right now.

    So I guess I have three questions.
    1 What kind of routine should I have for winding going forward?
    2 How do I clean it on a regular basis? Ultrasonic cleaner with water?
    3 Lastly How do I go about finding a trusted service shop in the St. Augustine, FL area? I know a good shop that is 2 hours drive but while he is an authorized Rolex dealer I believe he send his repairs out to a third party. For instance the vintage Wakmann was $900 to service. The Wakmann was inherited from my grandfather a number of years ago but not knowing how to find a trusted local repair shop left me with using a well recommended shop that is far away and seems a bit on the high side.

    I know, a shot in the dark that a world wide forum would be able to find a local shop but stranger things have happened.

    Thank you guys for reading and replying to my ramblings, I am sure my inexperience is showing, but it helps to clear my head a little while I am sitting here beside him.
     
  15. abrod520

    abrod520 Dec 4, 2020

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    Yes, seems like it could use a service. Would probably need one anyway since it's most likely been a very long time since the movement last got some attention.

    Wind it all the way up daily. For instance, I wind all my watches before I go to bed (some wind first thing in the morning, but I prefer to just be able to put it on and go)

    No - do not clean it with any liquids. Go buy a cheap toothbrush in the softest version, and you can use that to clean gunk in the corners. Buy some wooden toothpicks for the more difficult stuff, and you could always get a microfiber cloth to give it a quick rub as well. Whatever you do, make sure it's soft so it doesn't scratch the steel or crystal

    If he did good work on your Wakmann, then it'd be worth contacting him as well. That price is easily achievable for a chronograph service if it requires a couple replacement parts, so I would definitely budget something in that neighborhood. Good watchmakers aren't sitting on every corner, so often you'll need to ship it out or take it some distance. The good news is, the Valjoux 72 in your Autavia is a very common movement that an experienced watchmaker should have no trouble with.
     
  16. Redwes25

    Redwes25 Dec 4, 2020

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    You could post that question on https://omegaforums.net/ which is the sister site to this one. Your logon here will work there. That site has a bit more traffic and there might be a member in the area who knows a good watch matchmaker. Also, agree with Abrod that you should probably budget around that much to service a vintage chrono.
     
    Edited Dec 4, 2020
  17. Gatorade

    Gatorade Dec 4, 2020

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    Thanks for the speedy replies. I believe the Walkman is a Valjoux 730 and very similar to the Valjoux 72. So if the price sounds appropriate then I may contact him for it.
     
  18. abrod520

    abrod520 Dec 5, 2020

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    A 7730 is fairly similar to the 72, but in either case they are fairly common vintage movements which means a watchmaker should be familiar. Unlike some old watches with extremely rare movements (Excelsior Park, for instance) which some watchmakers will just not touch at all. I'd start with him first and see what he says; maybe if he's unable or unwilling to work on the Autavia he might know someone who could.
     
  19. Gatorade

    Gatorade Dec 5, 2020

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    Great suggestion, while I haven’t found any more information on a watchmaker I have had some great replies and discussions!

    https://omegaforums.net/threads/help-find-a-vintage-heuer-watchmaker-florida-georgia-area.123498/
     
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  20. whats_shakin

    whats_shakin Dec 9, 2020

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    For what it's worth, I had my 2446C (non-GMT) overhauled by Jack Alexyon at International Watch Works (in Cary, NC) and he did an amazing job...the Valjoux 72 in mine was basically not-running, and now it's basically new (movement wise). If you ask, he will provide an insured shipping label for you to send to him.

    It did take him six months to overhaul, though. He specializes in vintage repair, so he would definitely not touch anything you don't want him to parts-wise.

    Abel Court (HeuerTime.com) is the best in the world at vintage Heuer repair, and he stocks many original genuine Heuer parts, but he told me he has a 2+ year waitlist when I inquired over the summer, hence why I went with Jack. Abel is willing to sell parts, though, so I had him send me a NOS crystal for my 2446C and had Jack install.
     
    Edited Dec 9, 2020